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Folklore

Folklore Narratives and Adaptations

See also Links (indexed above) to Authors and Illustrators, Books Online and Lesson Plans

Index to Folktales, Stories, Plays, Films, and Songs reprinted in AppLit

Many other online resources are listed in AppLit Bibliographies of Appalachian Folktales in Children's Literature and Collections for all Ages and links to Authors and Illustrators.

Crow, Peter. Old Joe Grady Tales. Texts of twelve original tales told by an English professor on WVTF public radio.  They tell legends of Old Joe Grady, who grew up in the Smoky Mountains during the Great Depression. He had "a lifelong habit of quitting whatever job he was working as soon as he got his pockets full of money. Then he would travel about until he had run out of cash before looking for work again, always hiring on at something he had never done before. Southwestern Virginia became one of his favorite haunts."

Davenport Films. Contains background on each film by Virginia filmmakers Tom and Mimi Davenport, as well as other publications, excerpts from reviews, photos and video clips from films, ordering information. See also AppLit Bibliography on Davenport's fairy tale films and Once Upon a Time in Appalachia: Tom Davenport's Fairy Tale Films by Tina L. Hanlon.

Digital Library of Appalachia. Project of the Appalachian College Association Central Library. Includes copies of many archive materials from ACA colleges.

Frankie Silver Resources by Lana Whited, Associate Professor of English, Ferrum College, VA. Introductions and additional links to background on Sharyn Crumb's novel and other resources relating to the legendary NC murder of Frankie Silver's husband, and her trial and execution.

Gail E. Haley: Her Stories, Her Stories. Haley's web site with pictures and information on her writing, illustrating, puppetry, and author visits. Includes several illustrations with background on her books based on Appalachian folktales.

The Jack Tale Players. Performing Appalachian folktale dramatizations since 1975; based at Ferrum College, VA.

Jack Tales: A Project of the Media Working Group. Produced by a multi-media urban oral history project in the Covington, KY-Cincinnati area. Includes stories and poems inspired by traditional folktales of Jack and Molly/Mutsmag; a retelling of "Mutsmag" by Appalachian author Gurney Norman; versions of Jack tales by Ray Hicks, Donald Davis, and others; additional background resources. The Media Working Group web site also contains materials on folklorist Cratis Williams.  

Michael "Badhair" Williams. "Michael 'Badhair' is from the North Carolina Mountains, the heart of Appalachia.  He has been telling Appalachian folk tales on stage, in schools and at festivals across the country since 1975."

“Soap, Soap, Soap.” Adapted from Chase's Grandfather Tales by storyteller Barry McWilliams (Everett, WA). Full text online with an explanation of changes McWilliams made in the folktale. He added the moral, "Don't Forget where you are going and why you are going there! " (Other material on storytelling is also included in McWilliams' web site)

Telling Tales Teacher's Guide. Complete study guide with summaries of each tale, discussion questions and activities, to accompany KY Educational TV series of folktale programs. Includes Native American and African American tales as well as European based Appalachian tales. Teacher's Guide pdf files: Part One (with Table of Contents), Part Two. See http://www.ket.org/education for other information on KET programs and videos.

A Uniquely American Hero: Jack and His Place in the Folktale Tradition. Several web pages by Virginia Tech student Susan Tillotson, summarizing research on the history of folktales and Jack Tales, with several original drawings by Jasper A. Harris III. Includes Who is Jack? and What are Jack Tales?.

General Appalachian Folklore Resources

Many other online resources are listed in AppLit Bibliographies of Appalachian Folktales in Children's Literature and Collections for all Ages and links to Authors and Illustrators.

"The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress was created by Congress in 1976 'to preserve and present American Folklife.' The Center incorporates the Archive of Folk Culture, which was established at the Library in 1928 as a repository for American Folk Music. The Center and its collections have grown to encompass all aspects of folklore and folklife from this country and around the world."  

Association for Cultural Equity, New York City's Hunter College. An organization chartered in 1983 "to preserve, study, and disseminate folk performance traditions from around the world, and to oversee Alan Lomax’s collected works and recordings. ACE serves audiences through a virtual archive of media holdings on the internet; a large catalog of publications; and through assistance to researchers, media projects, and members of the public." "The Association for Cultural Equity was founded by Alan Lomax as a repository of the world’s expressive traditions. In line with the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, [its] work is based on the premise that primary cultural documents sustain societal morale and serve as key resources for all kinds of communities dealing with change and globalization." The video gallery includes a short video "Ray Hicks at his home, Banner Elk, Beech Mountain, North Carolina, 1983."

The Blue Ridge Institute and Museum at Ferrum College, Ferrum, VA. Web site contains online folklife exhibits and information on the BRI's farm museum, archives, October folklife festival, and other resources. Online resources include Activities for 4th Grade Standards of Learning Aligned with Learning Opportunities Presented at the Blue Ridge Folklife Festival and The Banjo in Virginia.

Local Legacies: Celebrating Community Roots. American Folklife Center. Library of Congress. 2000. Ferrum College's Blue Ridge Folk Life Festival has a page in the Virginia section, as well as Cherokee Native American Culture. The National Storytelling Festival in Tennessee, the outdoor drama Unto These Hills in NC,  the Trail of Tears Pow Wow in KY and other Appalachian cultural traditions are documented.

North Carolina Folklore Society. "Founded in 1913, the North Carolina Folklore Society promotes the appreciation and study of North Carolina's folklife. In its early years, members guided by Frank C. Brown of Duke University collected songs, stories, customs, and superstitions for The Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore, the most extensive collection of a state's folklore. In 1948 Society Secretary-Treasurer Arthur Palmer Hudson of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill began a state folklore journal now in its forty-third volume."

Tending the Commons: Folklife and Landscape in Southern West Virginia. American Folklife Center. Library of Congress. "The American Folklife Center's Coal River Folklife Project (1992-99) documenting traditional uses of the mountains in Southern West Virginia's Big Coal River Valley." Includes storytelling with online audio files and many other traditions and practices in the study area.

"The West Virginia Folklife Center at Fairmont State College is dedicated to the identification, preservation, and perpetuation of our region's rich cultural heritage, through academic studies, educational programs, festivals and performances, and publications. The WV Folklife Center is part of the School of Language and Literature." The center is directed by Dr. Judy P. Byers.

History

Historical Sites and Museums

Appalachian Culture Museum,  located in Boone, North Carolina, and part of Appalachian State University. This website was created by John A. Peterson and is maintained by Catherine G. Pinson, Ph.D. "The Appalachian Cultural Museum was created to foster an understanding of the people of the Appalachian Mountains and to serve as a laboratory for new museum ideas. Through exhibits, publications, and special events, the Museum presents the rich traditions of the region. The Museum gives new meaning to life in western North Carolina in a manner that is authentic and non-stereotypical."  

Appalachian Historical Landmarks. Appalachian Historical Landmarks (Center for Virtual Appalachia (CVA)) Links to numerous historical Appalachian sites. 

Beckley Exhibition Coal Mine, Beckley, WV. "1500 feet of underground passages have restored the mine operated by the Phillips Family in the late 1800's in what is now a part of New River Park in Beckley. Visitors ride a 'man trip' car guided through the mine by veteran miners for an authentic view of low seam coal mining from its earliest manual stages to modern mechanized operation."  The exhibition also includes a "Coal Life" Exhibit, a Coal Company House, and a Superintendent House. 

The Blue Ridge Institute and Museum at Ferrum College, Ferrum, VA. Web site contains online folklife exhibits and information on the BRI's farm museum, archives, October folklife festival, and other resources. See also Facebook page.

Blue Ridge Parkway Association. Asheville, NC. Many historical sites are found along the scenic Parkway between Shenandoah National Park, VA, and Cherokee, NC.

Booker T. Washington National Monument Home Page. The park in Hardy, VA. is open every day.  The web site describes Washington's life, park facilities, Visitor Center Exhibits (such as "The Great Educator" in 2001), guided tours, special events, research and related online exhibits. Booker T. Washington "was born in 1856 on the Burroughs tobacco farm which, despite its small size, he always referred to as a 'plantation.' His mother was a cook, his father a white man from a nearby farm. . . . He went to school in Franklin Countynot as a student, but to carry books for one of James Burroughs's daughters. It was illegal to educate slaves. 'I had the feeling that to get into a schoolhouse and study would be about the same as getting into paradise,' he wrote. In April 1865 the Emancipation Proclamation was read to joyful slaves in front of the Burroughs home. Booker's family soon left to join his stepfather in Malden, West Virginia. The young boy took a job in a salt mine that began at 4 a.m. so he could attend school later in the day. Within a few years, Booker was taken in as a houseboy by a wealthy towns-woman who further encouraged his longing to learn. At 16, he walked much of the 500 miles back to Virginia to enroll in a new school for black students." At Hampton Institute he earned his way through menial labor and then became a teacher. "Later, as principal and guiding force behind Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, which he founded in 1881, he became recognized as the nation's foremost black educator."

Burwell School Historic Site is "a historic house museum located in Hillsborough, NC that preserves and interprets the history of its antebellum and Civil War era residents." Some characters in Lee Smith's 2006 historical novel On Agate Hill are based on Burwell School people.

Cass Scenic Railroad, Cass, WV.  "Nestled in the mountains of West Virginia, Cass Scenic Railroad State Park offers an excursion that will transport you back in time...and let you relive an era when steam-driven locomotives were an essential part of everyday life. Your trip to Cass will be filled with a rich history of the past, unparalleled views of a vast wilderness area, and a close-up encounter with the sights and sounds of original steam-driven locomotives."

Cherokee - see History of the Cherokee and Museum of the Cherokee Indian, below.

Gallery-V at Berea College "is a virtual museum gallery operated by Berea College.  It is a laboratory in which students & faculty explore museum-style, web-based education and a great place to learn about Southern Appalachian history & culture."

Ghost Town in the Sky. Western North Carolina's first theme park, built 1960-61 on Buck Mountain in imitation of ghost town attractions in the West, reopened in 2007 after resale and closing for five years. An incline railway and chairlift take visitors over 3300 feet to the park constructed on top of the mountain near Maggie Valley. Heritage Town Square at the park now includes a museum on the history of the Wild West, Western NC, and the park, as well as crafts. Two characters in Kerry Madden's novels, Gentle's Holler and Louisiana's Song, work at the park. Emmett is a teenage boy in a struggling Maggie Valley family who takes his siblings for an exciting day at the park in 1963 in Louisiana's Song (Viking, 2007).

History of the Cherokee. Comprehensive site “designed and maintained by Ken Martin, a Cherokee of mixed-blood and a tribal member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.”  The site includes history, images and maps, genealogy, books and newspapers, and related links.

Kentucky Coal Mining Museum http://www.kingdomcome.org/museum/  is located in the former coal camp town of Benham in Harlan County Kentucky. The site contains information on the museum, the town of Benham, and includes a few pictures of the museum.    

Matewan History. "The people of Matewan has a proud heritage. In our history page you will learn about the Battle of Matewan, fantasies about the life of the Hatfield's and the McCoy's, see how our town has survived many devastating floods, and read about the movie MATEWAN. The Legacy is an article written by Paula Blankenship to summaries the highlights of our proud history."

Museum of Appalachia. "A living history museum of pioneer, frontier, and early artifacts of mountain life in the Southern Appalachians." Norris, TN.

Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Cherokee, NC. Includes official interpretive site for the National Park Service "Trail of Tears National Historic Trail,"

Pocahontas Exhibition Coal Mine and Museum. "Step into the historic Pocahontas Exhibition Coal Mine; listen as guides explain the story of mining the famous Pocahontas Number Three coal, and how the hand-loading era of the industry slowly succumbed to mechanization, and how the coal produced the energy which made this country great." 

Southern Appalachia Railway Museum. Knoxville/Oak Ridge, TN.

Virginia's Indians, Past and Present. Internet School Library Media Center provides links to many resources and texts online.

Other Historical Resources

Collis P. Huntington Railroad Historical Society (Kenova, WV), A Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. "Founded in 1959 to 'preserve documents and artifacts of railroad history, to promote the use and improvement of the present railroad industry, to acquire and restore rolling stock for display and operations, and to generally encourage public interest in the ongoing story of the North American railroads,' it became a chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in 1961." 

Encyclopedia of Appalachia. Ed. Rudy Abramson and Jean Haskell. Knoxville: Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2006. Entries are arranged alphabetically within each section, under the broad headings The Landscape, The People, Work and the Economy, Cultural Traditions, and Institutions. Entries by 1000 contributors. Contents overview, sample entries and background at encyclopedia web site. AP article on publication of the book by Duncan Mansfield, "Reference Book Tackles 'Hillbilly' Stereotype: Work Chronicles Facts on Appalachia," Louisville [KY] Courier-Journal 6 Mar. 2006. Similar article "Encyclopedia of Appalachia Offers Realistic Picture of Region" in Kingsport [Tenn.] Times-News 9 Mar. 2006. ETSU news report 3 Mar. 2006. Article by  Bob Batz Jr., "Encyclopedia Opens Window on Appalachia," Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 14 Mar. 2006.

Jeff Miller's West Virginia Page. Miller (who grew up in Beckley and is now a teacher at Gulf High School in Florida) includes "The Famous West Virginians Page; A West Virginia Chronology; Some interesting facts about West Virginia; The Governors of West Virginia and the U. S. Senators from West Virginia; Origins of West Virginia Place Names; Largest West Virginia cities, by past censuses; Danny Heater made high school basketball history; Marshall University football team tragedy Part 1, Part 2."  Other sites maintained by Miller include The West Virginia Broadcasting History Page and History of Beckley and Raleigh County (WV). 

Mine Country provides the history of the Anthracite Coal Region of Pennsylvania. 

Southern History. "At first this site was established in 1998.  It was then dedicated to the history of Tennessee. . . .the site has evolved to encompass the history of the American South. . . .The temporal parameters are essentially 1609 through 2000. Topics can include a variety of subjects, including but not limited to slavery, ethnic history, war, colonization, early republic, expansionism, religion, urban history, urban and rural politics, histories of police forces and of fire fighting, women’s history, biography, architectural history, progressive era topics, the New Deal, musical history, local, state and regional topics, civil rights, industrial and business history, gay and lesbian history, state and local history, medical history, the history of recreation or trade and business, maritime history, prostitution, drug use and abuse, the history of settlement, sports history, papers dealing with the extraction industries such as coal mining and oil, and related cultural and environmental history, the history of southern violence, the code duello, municipal bossism, and other engaging topics that have not been addressed here."  You can also access articles by state.

Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture is a "definitive and comprehensive reference work on The Volunteer State cosponsored by the University of Tennessee Press and the Tennessee Historical Society."  

West Virginia Division of Culture and History. "The mission of the Division of Culture and History is to help people identify, preserve, protect, promote, and present ideas, arts, and artifacts of our West Virginia Heritage, building pride in our past accomplishments and confidence in our future." The site contains a Calendar of Events, State Museum, State Archives, Arts Commission, Historic Preservation, Historic Sites, and a substantial report on ethnic communities, An Introduction to West Virginia Ethnic Communities.  

West Virginia Tourism Attractions. This site contains links to WV Glassmaking, Rail Heritage, Civil War Sites, Civil War History, and National Coal Heritage Area.

Journals and Magazines

See also AppLit's Journals on Folktales and Storytelling.

ALCA-Lines: Journal of the Assembly on the Literature and Culture of Appalachia. Affiliate of National Council of Teachers of English. Available in paper and in pdf at this site beginning with 2004 issue, along with some archive files.

Appalachia. Appalachian Mountain Club. "Published biannually since 1876, Appalachia is the longest-running journal of mountaineering and conservation."

Appalachian Heritage: A Literary Quarterly of the Appalachian South. "Since 1973, Appalachian Heritage has been a leading literary magazine of the Southern Appalachian Region. With a subscription to Appalachian Heritage, you will delight in the poetry, thoroughly enjoy the short stories, be stimulated by the literary biography and criticism, and be awed by the photography and art. You will also find that you can keep up with new regional books, literary events and news easily in the quarterly issues of Appalachian Heritage and on our website."

Appalachian Journal: A Regional Studies Review, "founded in 1972, is a cross-disciplinary journal featuring field research, interviews, and other scholarly studies of history, politics, economics, culture, folklore, literature, music, ecology, and a variety of other topics, as well as poetry and reviews of books, films, and recordings dealing with the region of the Appalachian mountains."

Blue Ridge Traditions Magazine: Celebrating the Culture of the Blue Ridge Region. Rocky Mount, VA. Web site includes online book reviews.

Carolina Arts Onlline. "A publication covering the arts in the Carolinas." Bonneau, SC.

Floyd County Moonshine Magazine. 2009- "A literary and arts magazine localized in Floyd, Virginia and the New River Valley. We accept poetry, short stories, and essays addressing all manner of themes; however, preference is given to those works of a rural or Appalachian nature. We accept artwork in a digital format. We welcome cutting-edge and innovative fiction and poetry in particular. Don’t be afraid to experiment." See also Facebook page.

Goldenseal, "the magazine of West Virginia traditional life, takes its stories from the recollections of West Virginians living throughout the state. Oral history fieldwork and documentary photography result in four issues per year with articles on subjects such as labor history, folklore, music, farming, religion, traditional crafts, food and politics." The web site provides sample articles featured in recent issues.

Graffiti is an online newsletter with news and information about the Appalachian region. The newsletter changes monthly.  

Hillchild "is a folklore journal by children, for children, and about children of Appalachia. Hillchild is currently in the process of publication. Submissions can be made to the West Virginia Folklife Center at Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia." The first annual volume was published in 2004. Review by West Virginia scholar Phyllis Wilson Moore.

Journal of Appalachian Studies "is a refereed journal published twice per year by the Appalachian Studies Association (ASA) with support from the Marshall University. It is the official journal of the ASA, a multi-disciplinary organization for scholars, teachers, activists, and others whose work focuses on the Appalachian region. The Journal of Appalachian Studies supersedes earlier publications of the ASA, including Proceedings and the Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association."

mountainechoes.com is an online magazine of Appalachian culture. Rae Anne Blair is the editor-in-chief and Jerry Blair is the web architect. Contributors submit fiction, nonfiction, etc. on a monthly basis.  The site contains a General Store, back issues, and much more.

Mountain Edge – Online Magazine is an electronic magazine created by Paul McQuain and McQuain Advertising. It is published from Elkins, West Virginia, U.S.A. The marvels of electronics and the Internet now make it possible to communicate world wide in an instant. Mountain Edge is about people, places and things in the “Mountain State” of West Virginia, U.S.A. As an online magazine, Mountain Edge is not only a local site but a worldwide site as well, bringing Mountain State people and interests to others in an instant.” 

The Mountain Times. A weekly publication serving North Carolina's High Country Region, Boone, North Carolina. The site includes an article on spirits and haints in stories as well as articles and information on folklore.  The Mountain Times also includes a link to the index for the comic strip Dan'l, which appears in the publication. "On February 11, 1999, in the Valentine's issue of The Mountain Times, the weekly comic strip Dan'l was born. It's the adventures of a boy, a bear, a bug, and all the other critters that reside here in the Blue Ridge Mountains." 

Mount Zion Speculative Fiction Review: A Journal of Appalachian Horror and Fantasy. Founded in 2005. Named after a fictional town in rural eastern Tennessee.

Nantahala: A Review of Writing and Photography in Appalachia is an online journal.

New Southerner: The Mainstream Magazine of Alternative Thinking. Louisville, KY. "New Southerner is a quarterly online magazine of literary journalism about Southern people, places and issues. We encourage readers to live a more meaningful, self-sufficient life through thought-provoking and instructive articles on good stewardship of our land, conservation of natural resources, neighborliness and support of local communities. We also highlight visual art and literature that show appreciation of these values in Southern culture." Includes a section for writing by high school students and undergraduates. Example relevant to Appalachian literature and folklore: Interview with Anne Shelby by Bobbi Buchanan in Fall 2007.

Now & Then:  The Appalachian Magazine Homepage “tells the story of Appalachia, the mountain region that extends from northern Mississippi to southern New York state.  Three times a year, the magazine presents a fresh, revealing picture of life in Appalachia, past and present, with engaging articles, personal essays, fiction, poetry, and photography.” Edited at East Tennessee State University.

Oral Tradition. Center for Studies in Oral Tradition. Columbia, MO. International journal became available electronically in 2006.

Pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts and Culture. Edited by Frank X Walker, 2007- .

16 Blocks. A monthly magazine for all kinds of people, especially younger adults, in the Blacksburg, Virginia area (which was originally planned as a 16-block town). It covers many kinds of topics, including articles on the Virginia Tech power plant and mountaintop removal. See also online Interview with WV author Denise Giardina, March 2009.

Traditions (based at Fairmont State College, Fairmont, WV) "is designed to promote West Virginia's rich heritage and to enhance educational applications and scholarly inquires of folklore. Publications will be made annually and will be 48-page, 8 1/2 x 11 periodicals containing educational materials and activities from across the curriculum, folklore content, scholarly articles, and extensive resource listings."

Virginia Libraries. Available online since 1996, with list of contents online back to 1984. Has author interviews (such as Donald Davis on storytelling and Thomas Rain Crowe on the environment and poetry) and other articles relating to library resources, etc.

West Virginia History Journal. "Since 1939, West Virginia History has featured some of the best scholarship on the economic, political, social, and cultural history of West Virginia and the Appalachian region. West Virginia History also reviews the latest books on state and regional history."

Wonderful West Virginia, "the premier magazine about the Mountain State, published monthly by the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources." The web site provides sample articles featured in recent issues.

Note: Many other state and local publications publish material about Appalachian literature and culture.

Lesson Plans and Other Resources for Teachers

See also AppLit Lesson Plans and Background Resources on Appalachian Literature for Children and Young Adults.

All America Reads: Additional Resources: Flora and Fauna Scrapbook – Use with Wish You Well, by David Baldacci, to help students visualize setting of novel.  Other lesson plans for Wish You Well also available.  

AEL "is governed by a 28-member Board of Directors, made up of educators and others concerned about education in its primary service area:  Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. AEL's major work is funded through several contracts and grants from the U.S. Department of Education."  Rural Education Directory:  Section 3  contains links to Media, Periodicals, Publishers, and Producers.  Access the online newsletter for updated information with links.  The site is part of ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools

Appalachian Intermediate Unit 8 Homepage serves Bedford, Blair, Cambria, and Somerset counties, PA.  The site provides a link to online order forms for lesson plans as well as additional links relating to Appalachian Pennsylvania. 

Appalachian Power. "This internet-based (not-for-profit) educational service was founded in 2001, sponsored by the Nicholas County Board of Education, Summersville, West Virginia and funded through 21st Century grant. It has a mission to sustain, preserve and enhance the Appalachian Heritage through online technology viewing, providing a networking system with others and disseminating information to the classroom and to the general public. This resource center is designed to heightened the awareness of an individualist region." The site includes Oral Histories, Geography, History, Economy, Colleges, Public School Networking Directory, Music, Poets, Writers (Janice Holt Giles, Jim Wayne Miller, Gurney Norman, Breece Pancake), Artists, etc.

Appalachian Riddle Song (Lesson Plan). Capture your students' attention with this lesson focusing on “The Riddle Song” to show the pentatonic scale and Appalachian culture.

Appalachian Songs and Singing Games Project. Susan W. Mills, Ed.D. Appalachian State University, 2010. Lessons for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, based on Leonard Roberts Papers, Berea College Hutchins Library, Special Collections and Archives.

The Appalachians. Study Guide available as pdf, for 2005 film, The Appalachians, an Evening Star Production presented by Nashville Public Television and distributed to public television stations nationally by American Public Television. Sierra Club web site.

ASA Teaching and Learning: Appalachian Syllabi. "The Appalachian Studies Association's on-line syllabus archive has been created as both a resource for teachers designing Appalachian Studies courses and as well as a history of the teaching of Appalachian Studies.  You may also perform a search of the entire archive to look for a course by course name, discipline, institution, or instructor."  Some of the syllabi have extensive links.

The Blue Ridge Institute and Museum, Ferrum, VA. Online resources include Activities for 4th Grade Standards of Learning Aligned with Learning Opportunities Presented at the Blue Ridge Folklife Festival and Virginia SOLs: The Banjo in Virginia, with activities for different levels of elementary grades.

Booker R. Washington National Monument. Web site has lesson plans, field trip plans and other curriculum materials, as well as junior ranger program for kids and calendar of events at the plantation in Franklin County, VA, where Booker T. Washington was born (see also History section above).

Born on a Mountaintop? Davy Crockett, Tall Tales, and History. Grade Levels 3-5. The learning objectives of this unit: "Name tall tale characters and locations, which are based on actual people and places, and describe how they are used in an exaggerated way. Name created characters and events from tall tales.  List some of the literary characteristics of tall tales. Write a tall tale." Includes discussion of other tall tale heroes such as John Henry. Skills involved are primary document analysis, literary analysis, creative writing. Questions considered: "What made David Crockett one of the most famous Americans during his lifetime? Why did his legend still loom so large in the American imagination long after his death? In what ways is he typical of the heroes of the tall tales that sprang up during the first half of the 19th century? Provides links to NCTE/IRA standards for English and language arts and National Council for the Social Studies standards, as well as state standards. An Edsitement web site selected by NEH.

Childdrama.com. Homepage of Matt Buchanan, Playwright and Drama Teacher. Lesson plans and other resources for drama teachers and producers of theatre for young people. Lesson plans include ideas for using picture books, nursery rhymes, art, puppets, masks, etc.

Classroom Resources in Documenting the American South. University of North Carolina Libraries. 2004- . Includes Library of Southern Literature, oral histories (Harriet Arnow Interview, 1976), slave narratives, and other collections, as well as teaching resources.

The Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling. Bernard R. Robin, University of Houston. "Educators at all levels can use Digital Storytelling in many ways, from introducing new material to helping students learn to conduct research, synthesize large amounts of content and gain expertise in the use of digital communication and authoring tools. It also can help students organize these ideas as they learn to create stories for an audience and present their ideas and knowledge in an individual and meaningful way." Recipient of 2009 MERLOT Award (Multimedia Educational Resources for Learning and Online Teaching).

Hindman Settlement School. The purposes and goals for which the Settlement was founded are the same today as they were in 1902. They are:  to provide educational opportunities for the boys and girls of this area, keep them mindful of their heritage and to provide community service activities. . . .The Hindman Settlement School's major educational emphasis today is its work with students with dyslexic characteristics. . . .Other program offerings include: library and bookmobile services; co-sponsorship of the Eastern Kentucky Teachers Network; 4-H Program; scholarship assistance for needy students; meeting facilities for community and regional groups; workshops on Appalachian life and culture (Appalachian Family Folk Week and Appalachian Writers Workshop); artist residences in the public school; community education classes; used clothing and food for the needy and many other services."  The Settlement also offers an Adult Learning Center and Crafts Shop. 

"How the Possum Lost His Tail." Lesson for K-1st grade, on Cherokee tale told by Freeman Owle, with text of tale from Living Stories of the Cherokee, ed. Barbara R. Duncan (Chapel Hill: Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1998, pp. 212-215). Museum of the Cherokee Indian web site, Cherokee, NC.

In Their Own Country is a series of fourteen programs highlighting some of the best authors of West Virginia, including Cynthia Rylant, Sandra Belton, Mary Lee Settle, Denise Giardina, and others. The series producer, Kate Long, writes, "Some of the state's best musicians have supplied background music. I asked them to play what the writers were saying. They played to the rhythm of the writer’s speech." The Charleston Gazette: “... a major piece of work ... showing the nation what a treasure trove of talented writers - and strange and wonderful minds - these hills have produced.” 

Journey From the Mountain to the Sky by Becki Jones. “Complete Lesson Plans to A Fantasy Journey From the Past to the Future with Appalachian Folk Music.”  Best to go to http://www.usamusic.org (Click on “American Music Education Initiative” then on “View Current Lessons” then on “Journey From the Mountain to the Sky”)

Kindergarten Lesson 2: How Strawberries Came into the World. Focuses on the picture book by Joseph Bruchac, The First Strawberries: A Cherokee Story. In Crossroads:  A K-16 American History Curriculum. The project is administered by the Council for Citizenship Education.  

Learning about Mountains: An On-line Guide to Resources for Teachers and Kids. The Find a Resource section contains pages on individual books, journals, and web resources. In The Mountain Institute web site. Most of the books listed as Appalachian are about the southern Appalachian mountains, but some are set in the North. 

MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning Online and Teaching). California State University. Open repository for online teaching materials recommended by members. Includes professional peer review of some materials.

Nancy Polette's Children's Literature Site contains lesson plans for several Appalachian children's books.

Native American Traditional Storytelling. Tsalagi/Cherokee page has links to a number of writers.

NEA's Read Across America program, Books from all the 50 states list. National Education Association. List of children's books that enable readers to travel through literature across every state, including a number of Applachian books.

Once Upon a Time: Lessons for Teaching About Fables, Fairy Tales, Folktales, Legends, Myths, Tall Tales. Gary Hopkins. Education World, 2009. Links to lessons for all grade levels.

Oral Traditions: Swapping Stories. The focus is on Louisiana folklore, not Appalachia, but this site, which includes John Henry and Virginia Hamilton as additional examples, provides detailed models of lesson plans for examining oral storytelling traditions, tall tales, urban legends, regional folk heroes, family stories, and media celebrities, linked with state standards of learning. For English Language Arts and Social Studies, grades 4-8.  You can access the Lesson Plan by going to Folklife in Louisiana. Click on Louisiana Voices Folklife in Education Project.  (You will have to complete a registration form to access the Lesson Plan.)

“The Robinson Scholar Writers Workshop met for two weeks in the summer of 2001. High school seniors from Eastern Kentucky came together to write poems, short stories, and essays. The students were inspired by the following Appalachian writers - by listening to them speak and reading their words: George Ella Lyon; Old Wounds, New Words: Poems From the Appalachian Poetry Project. Edited by Bob Henry Barber, George Ella Lyon, and Gurney Norman. Ashland, Kentucky: The Jesse Stuart Foundation, 1994. Gurney Norman; Kinfolks: The Wilgus Stories. Frankfort, Kentucky: Gnomon Press, 1977; Back Talk From Appalachia: Confronting Stereotypes . Edited by Dwight B. Billings, Gurney Norman, and Katherine Ledford. Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky, 1999. Crystal Wilkinson; Blackberries, Blackberries. London, England: The Toby Press, 2000. In addition, students heard from Nyoka Hawkins, Assistant Director of The Appalachian Center at The University of Kentucky.”  

Sohn, Katherine Kelleher. Whistlin' and Crowin' Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices Since College. Studies in Writing and Rhetoric series. Carbondale: Southern Illinois Univ. Press, 2006. A study of the lives and uses of literacy of eight eastern Kentucky women who had been nontraditional students in Sohn's composition classes and had  graduated from college. Based on award-winning doctoral research in rhetoric and linguistics by an English professor at Pikeville College. Sohn's web site includes reviews and discussion questions for book groups. The title is based on the Appalachian saying "Whistlin' women and crowin' hens, always come to no good ends." Also discussed in "Whistlin' and Crowin' Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices Since College." College Composition and Communication, vol. 54:3 (2003): 423-52. Article available online through library services such as JSTOR.

TAPORI Children Living in the Appalachian Mountains. "In 1999, many children from Southwest Virginia and West Virginia participated in the Tapori traveling exhibit when it passed through their area. Children were asked to share what they believe to be important in their community and then to illustrate their ideas. Their drawings were put on a panel with flip-up pictures to reveal underneath what the children had written about the chances and rights that all children should have. This February, Rosie and Arnaud, from Tapori, went back to visit this area, taking the beautiful chances panel. This visit was another opportunity for some of the children to share about their lives in Appalachia. This is what they told Rosie and Arnaud. . . ."  Comments from Appalachian children. Also includes an Activity Page.

Using Graphic Organizers to Generate Genre Definitions For Fables, Fairy Tales, Folktales, Legends, Myths, and/or Tall Tales. Education World. Grades 3 and up.

Virginia Bibliography – Williamsburg Regional Library: Kid’s Corner  Settings of works are noted.  Also includes programs, links, and available youth services.

Virginia Center for Children's Books at the University of Virginia Although the site is not devoted to Appalachian Children's Literature, it "is designed to get easily accessible information to teachers, librarians, and parents about the best new children’s books being published every month."

Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) 

Virtual West Virginia "is a creation of students at John Adams Junior High and Milton Middle School. . . .Virtual West Virginia is a place to come to familiarize yourself with West Virginia. Students have researched a variety of subjects ranging from our plants and animals to tours of cities, buildings and points of interest. Many people who know little of West Virginia characterize us as hillbillies due to the mountain heritage. We are proud of that heritage. We hope you enjoy learning a little about West Virginia and can come see the state for yourself. Enjoy!"

Williamsburg Public Library lists books set in VA by place (not all of Virginia is in Appalachia).

WVDE IBM Reinventing EducationBest Practices. While not devoted specifically to Appalachian studies, this site does contain high quality Lesson Plans (listed by author, subject, course, grade), including handouts.  The individual Lesson Plans also contain West Virginia Instructional Goals and Objectives (IGOs) and links to National Standards of Learning.

West Virginia Resource Guide. "West Virginia:  A Historical Resource Guide comprises a selected list of publications which will assist the teacher in locating additional resources for enriching the West Virginia video program in the classroom.  The Guide is not comprehensive, but represents an attempt to provide the teacher, who desires to expand a lesson plan in particular subjects, with significant books and articles."

West Virginia Instructional Goals and Objectives (IOG)

West Virginia's Appalachian Music and Literature. Teaching unit by teachers Reneé Wyatt and Avis Caynor, formerly in World School web site, now in this web site.

Woody, the Kentucky Wiener. Kentucky Press Association. A series of stories by Leigh Ann Florence, illustrated by James Asher, began appearing in newspapers across Kentucky in September, 2005. Although the author and Woody the wiener dog are from western KY (Calloway County), Woody and his sister Chloe travel across Kentucky in the stories, teaching children about different parts of the state, and promoting reading, writing and civic literacy. Educational activities and pictures on their web site. Also published in a series of books.
 

Music

Complete List of AppLit Pages on Music

Allegheny Echoes  Snowshoe, WV, Workshops offer a study and celebration of Appalachian music and verse.  Join honored performers for a week of instruction and fun.  "Allegheny Echoes is the concept of a group of West Virginia musicians and writers who wish to promote, support, preserve, and teach their own art from within. Their goal is to provide an accurate representation of West Virginia art that is not packaged and altered to appeal to a specific market. There will be a strong emphasis placed on West Virginia styles with an overall look toward embracing Appalachian culture. The week-long workshops will serve as a base from which to branch out into concerts, festivals, and other regularly scheduled programs and events." 

Alternate ROOTS "is an organization based in the Southern USA whose mission is to support the creation and presentation of original art, in all its forms, which is rooted in a particular community of place, tradition or spirit. As a coalition of cultural workers we strive to be allies in the elimination of all forms of oppression. ROOTS is committed to social and economic justice and the protection of the natural world and addresses these concerns through its programs and services...Alternate ROOTS was founded in 1976 at the Highlander Center in New Market, Tennessee in order to meet the distinct needs of artists who work for social justice, and artists who create work by, for, about and within communities of place, tradition, affiliation, and spirit. Originally an acronym for Regional Organization of Theaters South, ROOTS quickly established itself as a thought leader in the field of community-based arts and the only regional collective of artists committed to social and economic justice. In response to the needs of the growing field of community-based arts, ROOTS evolved to a multidisciplinary member-based and artist-driven organization. Member artists develop programs, and ROOTS provides resources for the needs of these socially conscious artists."

Appalachian Songs and Singing Games Project. Susan W. Mills, Ed.D. Appalachian State University, 2010. Lessons for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, based on Leonard Roberts Papers, Berea College Hutchins Library, Special Collections and Archives.

Cornbread When I'm Hungry: Part I and Cornbread When I'm Hungry: Part II  (from The Atlantic Monthly, November 1998) is a two-part article about Dock Boggs, an Appalachian banjo player and singer born in 1898.

The Crooked Road: Virginia's Heritage Music Trail. Historic music venues stretching through mountain landscape from Dickenson County to Franklin County. See also Facebook page.

Crooked Road in New York Times: Wildman, Sarah. "On Virginia's Crooked Road, Music Lights the Way." The New York Times: 21 May 2011: Travel. Excellent article with photos and video on The Crooked Road: Virginia's Heritage Music Trail. Includes discussion of the Blue Ridge Institute at Ferrum College, The Floyd Country Store, music at a Dairy Queen (which is in Franklin County), and many other Crooked Road landmarks.

Encyclopedia of Appalachia. Ed. Rudy Abramson and Jean Haskell. Knoxville: Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2006. Online Edition (2010- ) contains updated entries on Music of Appalachia (section editor Ted Olson), with some images and video. In the print encyclopedia, entries are arranged alphabetically within each section, such as Cultural Traditions: Folklore and Folklife, Cultural Traditions: Music Cultural Traditions: Language, Cultural Traditions: Literature. Entries by 1000 contributors. Contents overview, sample entries and background at encyclopedia web site.

Floyd Country Store. Floyd, VA. "A historic country store in the Blue Ridge Mountain community of Floyd, Virginia that features traditional Appalachian music events and a unique selection of local merchandise and clothing." Home of the Friday Night Jamboree, with old time music and dancing. On The Crooked Road: Virginia's Heritage Music Trail. See also Facebook page.

Folk Music - An Index to Recorded Resources.  "The recordings indexed generally have a major emphasis on tradition based material from both commercial and non-commercial performers, including a considerable amount of old-time fiddle and banjo tunes. Although most of the recordings included are vinyl LP's, many have been reissued in both cassette and CD format and out of print material can often be found in both public and university libraries." 

Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM). "Junior Appalachian Musicians, Inc. helps communities provide opportunities for children to participate in the old-time and bluegrass music and dance traditions of the Southern Appalachians." Founded in Alleghany County, NC in the spring of 2000. In 2011, active in over a dozen mountain counties in NC, SC and VA, with headquarters in Galax, VA. Web site includes links to music curricula.

Mountain Born: The Jean Ritchie Story. “Through interviews and recordings, Mountain Born: The Jean Ritchie Story not only chronicles the life of one folk singer and songwriter, but also introduces viewers to broader issues regarding the role of the traditional musician in contemporary society. Teachers will also find the program useful for generating classroom discussions about general topics such as life in Appalachia in the early part of the 20th century and the changing role of music in our lives, as well as more specific issues including the recent folk music revival and the influence of Appalachian music on performers from Johnny Cash to Bob Dylan.”  The site also includes a nice collection of pages specifically designed for teachers.

Mountain Women Rising. A performance group affiliated with the Appalachian Women's Alliance, Floyd, VA.

Reel World String Band. A band of women celebrating traditional music and social justice for 30 years (30th year celebrated 2008)..

Song Histories contains some background information on songs like Froggie Went a-Courtin', John Henry, She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain, and Old Dan Tucker. 

Tending the Commons: Folklife and Landscape in Southern West Virginia "incorporates 679 excerpts from original sound recordings and 1,256 photographs from the American Folklife Center's Coal River Folklife Project (1992-99) documenting traditional uses of the mountains in Southern West Virginia's Big Coal River Valley."

Traditional Appalachian Music and Stories: Russ Childers "Using story and song, the artist shares memories of his family's Eastern Kentucky farm life." Really GREAT site.

A Traditional Music Library by Rod Smith reprints a number of Appalachian music collections, including books by Cecil Sharp and Alan Lomax. It "contains only public domain category folk, traditional and roots music...There are also MIDI files for many of the songs." Music education and reference and dance books are also included. One of the categories is Traditional Children's Songs & Nursery Rhymes.

Tucker, Abigail. "A Musical Tour Along the Crooked Road." Smithsonian Magazine. Sept. 2011. Smithsonian.com. Article with photos about the Crooked Road, Virginia's heritage music trail. Includes visits to Floyd Country Store, Blue Ridge Institute, Carter Family Fold, etc.
 

Personal Web Pages

See also links to Authors and Illustrators. Most authors, artists, and researchers now have their own web sites, as well as blogs and Facebook pages.

Biggers, Jeff. The United States of Appalachia. Shoemaker & Hoard, 2006. This groundbreaking book argues that Appalachia has been in the vanguard of many developments in American history, even though it has been severely misrepresented in mass media. The chapter "We Are All Appalachians" includes an overview of literary history, including discussion of Appalachia's influence on writers whose best-known works are not usually associated with the region, such as Pearl Buck and Francis Hodgson Burnett. Interviews and excerpts available through Biggers web site. "Moving Mountains to Mine Coal," Biggers' radio commentary on NPR's Marketplace on Aug. 28, 2007, is available at this link.

Hillsweb. “Bobby Allen lives in Inez KY and has taught school at Sheldon Clark High School for the last 14 years.”  The site includes Allen’s fiction (humorous and ghost stories), articles (covering all aspects of Appalachian culture), editorials, biographies (Daniel Boone, Russell Williamson, Devil Anse Hatfield, and Rev. James Grayson), genealogy, and links (a variety of impressive sites located in KY).

MoonShiner's Jar. Authored by a native of Tennessee, this site is probably meant to reflect Appalachian humor.  However, it does not address the differences between Appalachian humor and stereotypes, which may cause problems.  This could be a useful site for those studying dialect and stereotypes.  An example of text from the site follows:  "That's me, tha 'ol MoonShiner, a standin b hind tha stil with tha shotgun a pointin hat uenze (jest n case u hapin 2 b a revanewer!!!). That thar is my halper, Junior, on tha left with tha jar a fixin 2 catch tha corn squeezins."

Mountain Page. Author Autumn Kruer offers short summaries of the geography of Appalachia, the origins of its people, and their culture (heroes, oddities, etc.).  The site includes links.

“In The Mountain Laurel, you'll find history, genealogy from people searching for Blue Ridge Roots, recipes, crafts, interviews, some mighty tall tales, Mountain Backroad Tours to out of the way places, and much more.”  The site contains Seasonal Stories. Susan Thigpen, editor.

State Pages

Commonwealth of Virginia Homepage  This site contains links to several topics; Family & Education and About Virginia are good areas for research.

Daniel Boone Country web site on Southeastern Kentucky.

50states.com allows you to access all 50 states, the commonwealths and territories.  Just click on the state you need information about.

The Heart of Appalachia. Southwest Virginia, based in Big Stone Gap. "The Heart of Appalachia proudly represents the counties of Buchanan, Dickenson, Lee, Russell, Scott, Tazewell and Wise and the City of Norton."

Georgia Appalachia. Georgia Department of Economic Development.

State of Tennessee Home Page contains history, symbols, origin of county names, former governors, Tennessee's environment, geology, weather, laws.  

Links to West Virginia Web Sites contains links to numerous sites relating to WV.  

Ohio. Governor's Office of Appalachia "represents the interests of the 29 counties comprising East Central, Southeast and Southern Ohio. The GOA is a division within the Ohio Department of Development and works on behalf of the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) in Washington, D.C."

United States Resources: West Virginia. Contains links to Other West Virginia Genealogy and History Pages; General Resources; Archives, Libraries and Special Collections; Cemeteries; Ethnic and Religious; Local History and Information; Maps and Gazetteers; Military; Photographs; Societies, Historical and Genealogical; Vital Records; and Commercial. 

West Virginia Writers. “West Virginia Writers, Inc. is the state's largest organization for writers, offering  many benefits for members.”  Group sponsors West Virginia Young Writers Fiction Competition.


Theatre

See also Books and Plays Online.

Alternate ROOTS "is an organization based in the Southern USA whose mission is to support the creation and presentation of original art, in all its forms, which is rooted in a particular community of place, tradition or spirit. As a coalition of cultural workers we strive to be allies in the elimination of all forms of oppression. ROOTS is committed to social and economic justice and the protection of the natural world and addresses these concerns through its programs and services...Alternate ROOTS was founded in 1976 at the Highlander Center in New Market, Tennessee in order to meet the distinct needs of artists who work for social justice, and artists who create work by, for, about and within communities of place, tradition, affiliation, and spirit. Originally an acronym for Regional Organization of Theaters South, ROOTS quickly established itself as a thought leader in the field of community-based arts and the only regional collective of artists committed to social and economic justice. In response to the needs of the growing field of community-based arts, ROOTS evolved to a multidisciplinary member-based and artist-driven organization. Member artists develop programs, and ROOTS provides resources for the needs of these socially conscious artists."

Barbara Bates Smith Productions. "Off-Broadway actress tours one-woman adaptations of works by prizewinning authors Lee Smith, Kaye Gibbons, and Fred Chappell, plus a variety of original scripts."

Barter Theatre, Abingdon, VA. Excellent site that provides information about current plays along with the history of the Barter Theatre. "Barter Theatre has developed a special series of plays designed to entertain and teach children. Perfect for groups and students, many of the plays fit specific SOLs for the Virginia school curriculum. A classroom literary guide is available by calling 276-619-3327 or online."  

The Blue Ridge Dinner Theatre. Ferrum College, Ferrum, VA. The BRDT operates from May or June to early August, as well as sponsoring several traveling shows and productions during the academic year, such as the very successful adaptation of A Christmas Carol in Dec. 2000, written by R. Rex Stephenson and Wedding Belles in April 2009. "Founded in 1978, the BRDT has produced four or five major plays per season as well as a number of other productions. Every year the BRDT premieres at least one original production. For audiences, The Blue Ridge Dinner Theatre promises wholesome family entertainment that blends the educational purpose of theatre with the powerful force of drama." The summer season includes a children's play in which actors of all ages work together, as well as Jack Tales performances (see link below). Student internships are available in the summer. Appalachian shows include original plays based on local and regional history, original musical revues, and productions of Smoke on the Mountain and its sequels. The web site includes photos and booking information. See also R. Rex Stephenson's web page (artistic director and playwright). See also Facebook page.

The Jack Tale Players. Performing Appalachian folktale dramatizations since 1975, with tales adapted and directed by R. Rex Stephenson; based at Ferrum College, VA. See also Facebook page.

Roadside Theater. "What would it be like for rural, central Appalachia to have a professional theater company and a body of original Appalachian drama? That’s what the founders of Roadside Theater asked themselves in 1975. We also wanted to know whether theater that relied on the local and the specific, rendered faithfully and imaginatively, could affect people anywhere. The answer turned out to be yes. Roadside has toured in 43 states, has been in residence a number of times off-Broadway, and has represented the United States at more than half-a-dozen international theater festivals, including in Sweden, Denmark, London, and the Czech Republic." The site contains information on performance schedules, the history of Roadside Theater, and much more. 

Southern Appalachian Repertory Theatre "was founded in 1975 as a joint effort of the Madison County Bicentennial committee and Mars Hill College.  From the beginning, SART’s purpose has been to produce quality theatre by a professional non-profit company in an area considered economically and culturally deprived, to present plays concerning Appalachia that portray the rich culture and heritage of its people and to promote the development of original plays."

Theater at Lime Kiln. "Located in historic Lexington, Virginia, Theater at Lime Kiln creates, presents and tours works reflecting the indigenous stories and music of its region and diligently seeks all segments of the populace as its audience."

Thousand Kites. An Appalshop project, "a community-based performance, web, video and radio project centered on the United States prison system." See also Facebook page.


Women

Appalachian Women's Alliance, Ironweed Festival, and Mountain Women Rising performance group. Floyd, VA.

Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia. Marshall University, Huntington, WV.

Listen Here: Women Writing in Appalachia, ed. Sandra L. Ballard and Patricia L. Hudson. U Press of KY, 2003. Thematic Table of Contents in this web site.

Lost Voices: Rediscovering the Contributions of African American Women to West Virginia "The creation of this website began as a class project at Marshall University, in Huntington, West Virginia." Authors: Ancella Bickley, Memphis T. Garrison, Jan Smith, and Maudella Taylor are discussed within the areas of biography, race, gender, religion, military, family, community, education, effect on community, current projects, etc.  Also included is a well developed section entitled Community Shaping Women

Elizabeth Madox Roberts Society.

Sohn, Katherine Kelleher. Whistlin' and Crowin' Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices Since College. Studies in Writing and Rhetoric series. Carbondale: Southern Illinois Univ. Press, 2006. A study of the lives and uses of literacy of eight eastern Kentucky women who had been nontraditional students in Sohn's composition classes and had  graduated from college. Based on award-winning doctoral research in rhetoric and linguistics by an English professor at Pikeville College. Sohn's web site includes reviews and discussion questions for book groups. The title is based on the Appalachian saying "Whistlin' women and crowin' hens, always come to no good ends." Also discussed in "Whistlin' and Crowin' Women of Appalachia: Literacy Practices Since College." College Composition and Communication, vol. 54:3 (2003): 423-52. Article available online through library services such as JSTOR.

Women in Tennessee History: A Bibliography. "The bibliography includes over 800 references to books, journal articles, theses, manuscript collections, and miscellaneous publications. In addition, over 100 links are provided to such online resources as multimedia exhibits, manuscript inventories, biographical profiles, and book reviews." The site also includes Women in Tennessee History: An Online Bibliography & Research Guide and Women in Tennessee History:  A Bibliography: The Arts and Literature.

Women of Appalachia Conference is held every fall at Ohio University-Zanesville. Zanesville, Ohio.

See also Strong Women in Appalachian Folktales in this web site, as well as AppLit bibliographies and study guides on cultural diversity and social issues.


This Page Created:  10/29/2000   |   Top of Page   |   Last Update: 9/20/11
Links Checked This Page: 03/16/04 (Folklore and Theatre checked 7/13/05) 


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