Photos from Dr. Whited's trip to England and Wales (July 2002)

Page 2– Stratford, Oxford, & London



The birthplace of William Shakespeare in Stratford-on-Avon. Shakespeare was born in the upstairs left room.


Shakespeare's wife Anne Hathaway was born in this cottage just outside Stratford.


The rooftops of Oxford from the cupula of the Sheldonian Theatre (a location recommended by Dr. David Howell, who earned a degree in Oxford.


Alice's Shop, Oxford. Charles Dodgson, aka Lewis Carroll, author of Alice Adventures in Wonderland, was a tutor at Christ Church, whose dean had a daughter named Alice Liddell. This shop is said to be the location where Alice Liddell bought bought barley sugar and the inspiration for the Old Sheep Shop in Through the Looking Glass.

(right) Trinity College, Oxford. The Reverend Henry Whitehead, who earned a B.A. from Trinity College in 1974 and then served as a"don" or professor at the college may have been an ancestor of Dr. Whited. (Henry Whitehead was later appointed principal at Bishop's College, Calcutta.) Another possible relative is George Whitehead, who earned a B.A. at Oxford in 1920.


Familiar scenes from London. Big Ben in fog (above), Buckingham Palace (top right), and the Tower of London (bottom right). The flag flying over Buckingham Palace signifies that the queen is in residence (Dr. Whited did not drop in).
One of the highlights of Dr. Whited's trip was visiting the tomb of Queen Elizabeth I at Westminster Abbey, the site of the coronation of most of England's kings and queens and the burial place of most monarchs until the mid-20th century. Many notable authors are buried at Poets' Corner in the South Transept, including Geoffrey Chaucer, Edmund Spenser, Charles Dickens, and Thomas Hardy (except his heart, which he asked to have buried in his native Dorset). The controversial Aphra Behn is buried outside the church under the walkway to the Cloisters.

The Three Bells pub in Whitechapel was a gathering place for the five prostitutes murdered by Jack the Ripper in late summer and fall 1888. While in London, Dr. Whited, who wrote a dissertation on murder narratives, took a walking Jack the Ripper tour of Whitechapel.